Easily Film Your Swimming For Improvement

Knowing what you look like when you are swimming is hard, the image you have in your head of what you may be doing when swimming is often a lot different to reality. Making technical changes in your stroke requires a lot of body awareness, not knowing exactly what your stroke looks like will make technical changes a real challenge.

 

Luckily this day and age we are blessed with super easy to use technology that can really help us develop our technique for swimming. Getting your swimming filmed is a really good way to improve your technique, as long as you are getting the right advice. If you have access to a coach who can video you over the water and under the water and give you feedback, you will be able to make changes easier.

 

If you do not have access to a coach you still have good options. You can very easily get someone to film you swimming on your smartphone so you can see exactly what you are doing. Get someone to walk next to you filming you with a smartphone while you swim a lap or 2 in the lane next to the side of the pool. This will give you excellent footage for you to analyze. This is what we get our Virtual Swim Squad members to do and send them into us so we can check their technique and explain to them what they are doing wrong and how to correct it. Our Virtual Swim Squad members get great results from doing this every 3 or 4 months.

 

smartphone with a swimmer swimming freestyle in a video

 

Once you know what you are doing wrong and you know how to correct it make sure to work really hard changing this particular habit. It can take around 3 months to change a habit in your technique if you consistently work on it. Make sure to check up on your stroke every few months if you are working on any changes so you can track if you are actually doing it and doing it the right way.

 

You all have smartphones sitting in your pockets – easily make use of them to help improve your swimming!

 

Carl is head coach at Swim360 Coach, a former Olympian and national champion freestyler. Carl now uses his skills and passion for coaching and competing in the open water.